Learning Outcomes

Applied Behavior Analysis

PROGRAM ASSESSMENT PLAN

Program Description

The Northeastern University Master of Science Program in Applied Behavior Analysis (widely known as the MABA Program) was founded in 1976. The MABA Program provides students with extensive coursework and training in applied behavior analysis. Students begin the program by taking coursework in basic behavioral principals; later courses extend the student’s knowledge beyond basic behavioral principles and procedures to more advanced concepts. While retaining a practitioner focus, this program gives students in-depth knowledge of topics such as conditioned reinforcement, motivational influences on behavior, and errorless teaching procedures. With this background, program graduates are prepared to address the most complex behavior problems and learning challenges.

Course content is based on the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB©) Fourth Edition Task List© and prepares students to take the Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) exam. Students complete 6 core courses, plus an additional 4 courses that extend the student’s familiarity with clinical procedures and with the research supporting their use. Students may elect to complete their supervised experience hours by taking Intensive Practicum 1 and Intensive Practicum 2 in addition to the 10 required courses.

Courses are delivered in an online format. Students attend lectures virtually and view supplementary material on their own schedules, taking advantage of technological advances that promote student learning and increase student-to-instructor and student-to-student communication.

A Professional Portfolio is the capstone for the Master of Science program. The Professional Portfolio is compiled of competencies students have achieved while in the program. Evidence is gathered from projects that students conduct as part of their coursework, including preference assessments, functional analyses, and intervention programs.

Learning Outcomes

*Student learning outcomes come directly from the BACB 4th Edition Task List©*

The first section, Basic Behavior-Analytic Skills, covers tasks that a practicing behavior analyst will perform with some, but probably not all, clients. These tasks represent basic, commonly used skills and procedures:

A: Measurement

A-01 Measure frequency (i.e., count).
A-02 Measure rate (i.e., count per unit time).
A-03 Measureduration.
A-04 Measure latency.
A-05 Measure interresponse time (IRT).
A-06 Measure percent ofoccurrence.
A-07 Measure trials to criterion.
A-08 Assess and interpret interobserver agreement.
A-09 Evaluate the accuracy and reliability of measurement procedures.
A-10 Design, plot, and interpret data using equal-intervalgraphs.
A-11 Design, plot, and interpret data using a cumulative record to displaydata.
A-12 Design and implement continuous measurement procedures (e.g., eventrecording).
A-13 Design and implement discontinuous measurement procedures (e.g., partial & whole interval, momentary time sampling).
A-14 Design and implement choice measures.

B: Experimental Design

B-01 Use the dimensions of applied behavior analysis (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1968) to evaluate whether interventions are behavior analytic in nature.
B-02 Review and interpret articles from the behavior-analytic literature.
B-03 Systematically arrange independent variables to demonstrate their effects on dependent variables.
B-04 Use withdrawal/reversal designs.
B-05 Use alternating treatments (i.e., multielement) designs.
B-06 Use changing criterion designs.
B-07 Use multiple baselinedesigns. B-08    Use multiple probedesigns.
B-09 Use combinations of design elements.
B-10 Conduct a component analysis to determine the effective components of an intervention package.
B-11 Conduct a parametric analysis to determine the effective values of an independent variable

C: Behavior Change Considerations

C-01 State and plan for the possible unwanted effects of reinforcement.
C-02 State and plan for the possible unwanted effects of punishment.
C-03 State and plan for the possible unwanted effects of extinction.

D: Fundamental Elements of Behavior Change

D-01 Use positive and negative reinforcement.
D-02 Use appropriate parameters and schedules of reinforcement.
D-03 Use prompts and prompt fading.
D-04 Use modeling and imitation training.
D-05 Use shaping.
D-06 Use chaining.
D-07 Conduct task analyses.
D-08 Use discrete-trial and free-operant arrangements.
D-09 Use the verbal operants as a basis for language assessment.
D-10 Use echoictraining.
D-11 Use mandtraining.
D-12 Use tacttraining.
D-13 Use intraverbaltraining.
D-14 Use listenertraining.
D-15 Identify punishers.
D-16 Use positive and negative punishment.
D-17 Use appropriate parameters and schedules of punishment.
D-18 Useextinction.
D-19 Use combinations of reinforcement with punishment and extinction
D-20 Use response-independent (time-based) schedules of reinforcement (i.e., noncontingent reinforcement).
D-21 Use differential reinforcement (e.g., DRO, DRA, DRI, DRL, DRH).

E: Specific Behavior-ChangeProcedures

E-01 Use interventions based on manipulation of antecedents, such as motivating operations and discriminative stimuli.
E-02 Use discrimination training procedures.
E-03 Use instructions and rules.
E-04 Use contingency contracting (i.e., behavioral contracts).
E-05 Use independent, interdependent, and dependent group contingencies.
E-06Use stimulus equivalenceprocedures.
E-07 Plan for behavioral contrast effects.
E-08 Use the matching law and recognize factors influencing choice.
E-09 Arrange high-probability request sequences.
E-10 Use the Premack principle.
E-11 Use pairing procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers and punishers.
E-12 Use errorless learning procedures.
E-13 Use matching-to-sampleprocedures

F: Behavior-ChangeSystems

F-01 Use self-management strategies.
F-02 Use token economies and other conditioned reinforcement systems.
F-03 Use Direct Instruction.
F-04 Use precision teaching.
F-05 Use personalized systems of instruction (PSI).
F-06 Use incidentalteaching.
F-07 Use functional communication training.
F-08 Use augmentative communication systems.

The second section, Client-Centered Responsibilities, includes tasks related to working with all clients and they should apply in most applied situations:

G: Identification of the Problem

G-01 Review records and available data at the outset of the case.
G-02 Consider biological/medical variables that may be affecting theclient.
G-03 Conduct a preliminary assessment of the client in order to identify the referral problem.
G-04 Explain behavioral concepts using nontechnical language.
G-05 Describe and explain behavior, including private events, in behavior-analytic (non-mentalistic) terms.
G-06 Provide behavior-analytic services in collaboration with others who support and/or provide services to one’sclients.
G-07 Practice within one’s limits of professional competence in applied behavior analysis, and obtain consultation, supervision, and training, or make referrals as necessary.
G-08 Identify and make environmental changes that reduce the need for behavior analysis services.

H: Measurement

H-01 Select a measurement system to obtain representative data given the dimensions of the behavior and the logistics of observing and recording.
H-02 Select a schedule of observation and recording periods.
H-03 Select a data display that effectively communicates relevant quantitative relations.
H-04 Evaluate changes in level, trend, and variability.
H-05 Evaluate temporal relations between observed variables (within & between sessions, time series).

I: Assessment

I-01 Define behavior in observable and measurable terms.
I-02 Define environmental variables in observable and measurable terms.
I-03 Design and implement individualized behavioral assessment procedures.
I-04 Design and implement the full range of functional assessment procedures.
I-05 Organize, analyze, and interpret observed data
I-06 Make recommendations regarding behaviors that must be established, maintained, increased, ordecreased.
I-07 Design and conduct preference assessments to identify putative reinforcers.

J:Intervention

J-01 State intervention goals in observable and measurable terms.
J-02 Identify potential interventions based on assessment results and the best available scientific evidence.
J-03 Select intervention strategies based on task analysis.
J-04 Select intervention strategies based on client preferences.
J-05 Select intervention strategies based on the client’s currentrepertoires.
J-06 Select intervention strategies based on supportingenvironments.
J-07 Select intervention strategies based on environmental and resourceconstraints.
J-08 Select intervention strategies based on the social validity of the intervention.
J-09 Identify and address practical and ethical considerations when usingexperimental designs to demonstrate treatment effectiveness.
J-10 When a behavior is to be decreased, select an acceptable alternative behavior to be established or increased.
J-11 Program for stimulus and responsegeneralization.
J-12 Program for maintenance.
J-13 Select behavioral cusps as goals for intervention when appropriate.
J-14 Arrange instructional procedures to promote generative learning (i.e., derivedrelations).
J-15 Base decision-making on data displayed in various formats.

K: Implementation, Management, and Supervision

K-01 Provide for ongoing documentation of behavioral services.
K-02 Identify the contingencies governing the behavior of those responsible for carrying out behavior-change procedures and design interventions accordingly.
K-03 Design and use competency-based training for persons who are responsible forcarrying out behavioral assessment and behavior-change procedures
K-04 Design and use effective performance monitoring and reinforcementsystems.
K-05 Design and use systems for monitoring procedural integrity.
K-06 Provide supervision for behavior-change agents.
K-07 Evaluate the effectiveness of the behavioral program.
K-08 Establish support for behavior-analytic services from direct and indirect consumers.
K-09 Secure the support of others to maintain the client’s behavioral repertoires in their natural environments.
K-10 Arrange for the orderly termination of services when they are no longer required.

The third section, Foundational Knowledge, covers concepts that should have been mastered prior to entering practice as a behavior analyst. The topics listed in this section are not tasks that a practitioner would perform; instead, they are basic concepts that must be understood in order to perform the tasks included in the first two sections:

Explain and Behave in Accordance with the Philosophical Assumptions of Behavior Analysis:

FK-01 Lawfulness of behavior
FK-02 Selectionism (phylogenic, ontogenic, cultural)
FK-03 Determinism
FK-04 Empiricism
FK-05 Parsimony
K-06 Pragmatism
FK-07 Environmental (as opposed to mentalistic) explanations of behavior
FK-08 Distinguish between radical and methodological behaviorism.
K-09 Distinguish between the conceptual analysis of behavior, experimental analysis of behavior, applied behavior analysis, and behavioral service delivery.

Define and Provide Examples of:

FK-10 behavior, response, response class
FK-11 environment, stimulus, stimulus class
FK-12 stimulus equivalence
FK-13 reflexive relations (US-UR)
FK-14 respondent conditioning (CS-CR)
FK-15 operant conditioning
FK-16 respondent-operant interactions
FK-17 unconditioned reinforcement
FK-18 conditioned reinforcement
FK-19 unconditioned punishment
FK-20 conditioned punishment
FK-21 schedules of reinforcement and punishment
FK-22 extinction
FK-23 automatic reinforcement and punishment
FK-24 stimulus control
FK-25 multiple functions of a single stimulus
FK-26 unconditioned motivating operations
FK-27 conditioned motivating operations
FK-28 transitive, reflexive, surrogate motivating operations
FK-29 distinguish between the discriminative stimulus and the motivating operation
FK-30 distinguish between motivating operation and reinforcement effects
FK-31 behavioral contingencies
K-32 contiguity
FK-33 functional relations
FK-34 conditional discriminations
FK-35 stimulus discrimination
FK-36 response generalization
FK-37 stimulus generalization
FK-38 behavioral contrast
FK-39 behavioral momentum
FK-40 matching law
FK-41 contingency-shaped behavior FK-42 rule-governed behavior

Distinguish between the Verbal Operants:

FK-43 Echoics
FK-44 Mands FK-45 Tacts
FK-46 Intraverbals Measurement Concepts:

  • FK-47 Identify the measurable dimensions of behavior (e.g., rate, duration, latency, interresponse time).
  • FK-48 State the advantages and disadvantages of using continuous measurement procedures and discontinuous measurement procedures (e.g., partial- and whole-interval recording, momentary time sampling).

The following learning objectives are taught to mastery, as described in the BACB© Professional and Ethical Compliance Code©:

1.0 Responsible Conduct of Behavior Analysts

1.01 Reliance on Scientific Knowledge
1.02 Boundaries of Competence
1.03 Maintaining Competence through Professional Development
1.04 Integrity
1.05 Professional and Scientific Relationships
1.06 Multiple Relationships and Conflicts of Interest
1.07 Exploitative Relationships

2.0 Behavior Analysts’ Responsibility to Clients

2.01 Accepting Clients
2.02 Responsibility
2.03 Consultation
2.04 Third-Party Involvement in Services
2.05 Rights and Prerogatives of Clients
2.06 Maintaining Confidentiality
2.07 Maintaining Records
2.08 Disclosures
2.09 Treatment/Intervention Efficacy
2.10 Documenting Professional Work and Research
2.11 Records and Data
2.12 Contracts, Fees, and Financial Arrangements
2.13 Accuracy in Billing Reports
2.14 Referrals and Fees
2.15 Interrupting or DiscontinuingServices

3.0 AssessingBehavior

3.01 Behavior-Analytic Assessment
3.02 Medical Consultation
3.03 Behavior-Analytic Assessment Consent
3.04 Explaining Assessment Results
3.05 Consent-Client Records

4.0 Behavior Analysts and the Behavior-Change Program

4.01 Conceptual Consistency
4.02 Involving Clients in Planning and Consent
4.03 Individualized Behavior-Change Programs
4.04 Approving Behavior-Change Programs
4.05 Describing Behavior-Change Program Objectives
4.06 Describing Conditions for Behavior-Change Program Success
4.07 Environmental Conditions that Interfere with Implementation
4.08 Considerations Regarding Punishment Procedures
4.09 Least Restrictive Procedures
4.10 Avoiding Harmful Reinforcers
4.11 Discontinuing Behavior-Change Programs and Behavior-AnalyticServices

Content area: Ethical and Professional Conduct

Required number

of classroom hours:

45

Number of hours

provided:

45
Course(s): CAEP 6329 Service Administration
How competence is assessed Grade of B or better in the above course(s).
Content area: Concepts & Principles of Behavior Analysis
Required number of classroom hours: 45
Number of hours provided: 90
Course(s):

CAEP 6328 Research & Design Methods CAEP 6334 Applied Programming 1

CAEP 6335 Applied Programming 2

CAEP 6336 Systematic Inquiry in Applied Research 1 CAEP 6332 Advanced Learning 2

CAEP 6337 Systematic Inquiry in Applied Research 2 CAEP 6324 Programmed Learning

How competence

is assessed

Grade of B or better in the above course(s).
Content area: Measurement
Required number of classroom hours: 25
Number of hours provided: 50
Course(s):

CAEP 6327 Behavior Assessment

CAEP 6328 Research & Design Methods CAEP 6335 Applied Programming 2

CAEP 6332 Advanced Learning 2

How competence is assessed Grade of B or better in the above course(s).
Content area: Experimental Design

Required number of classroom

hours:

25
Number of hours provided: 30
Course(s):

CAEP 6328 Research & Design Methods CAEP 6335 Applied Programming 2

CAEP 6332 Advanced Learning 2

How competence is assessed Grade of B or better in the above course(s).
Content area: Identification of the Problem and Assessment
Required number of classroom hours: 30
Number of hours provided: 60
Course(s):

CAEP 6327 Behavior Assessment CAEP 6331 Advanced Learning 1

CAEP 6335 Applied Programming 2

CAEP 6337 Systematic Inquiry in Applied Research 2

How competence is assessed Grade of B or better in the above course(s).
Content area:

Fundamental Elements of Behavior Change & Specific Behavior Change

Procedures

Required number

of classroom hours:

45

Number of hours

provided:

65
Course(s):

CAEP 6331 Advanced Learning 1

CAEP 6336 Systematic Inquiry in Applied Research 1

CAEP 6332 Advanced Learning 2

CAEP 6324 Programmed Learning

How competence is assessed Grade of B or better in the above course(s).
Content area: Intervention & Behavior Change Considerations

Required number

of classroom hours:

10

Number of hours

provided:

20
Course(s):

CAEP 6331 Advanced Learning 1

CAEP 6336 Systematic Inquiry in Applied Research 1 CAEP 6324 Programmed Learning

How competence is assessed Grade of B or better in the above course(s).
Content area: Behavior Change Systems

Required number

of classroom hours:

10

Number of hours

provided:

20
Course(s):

CAEP 6331 Advanced Learning 1

CAEP 6336 Systematic Inquiry in Applied Research 1 CAEP 6332 Advanced Learning 2

CAEP 6324 Programmed Learning

How competence is assessed Grade of B or better in the above course(s).
Content area: Implementation, Management, and Supervision

Required number

of classroom hours:

10

Number of hours

provided:

20
Course(s):

CAEP 6328 Research & Design Methods

CAEP 6336 Systematic Inquiry in Applied Research 1 CAEP 6337 Systematic Inquiry in Applied Research 2

How competence is assessed Grade of B or better in the above course(s).

Intensive Practicum

Northeastern University’s MABA program offers two elective Intensive Practicum courses (CAEP 8417 and CAEP 8418) that allow students to gain supervised experience hours as required by the BACB©.

Approved by the BACB©, our Intensive Practicum courses are designed to develop teaching and intervention skills based on the principles of applied behavior analysis.

Course Description

The primary focus of the Intensive Practicum course is for students to acquire new behavior analytic skills related to the BACB© Fourth Edition Task List©. Topics covered during Intensive Practicum 1 include preference and reinforcer assessment, prompting, task analysis and other teaching strategies. Topics covered during Intensive Practicum 2 include functional assessment, conditioned reinforcement, behavior

reduction programs, and BCBA preparation.

Course Methodology

Students are expected to:

Ø  At the onset of the course, sign the Supervision Contract Form, with faculty supervisor.

Ø  Complete 25 experience hours each wek.

Ø  Participate in one small-group meeting (1.25 hrs.) and one individual meeting (1.25 hrs.) with faculty eachweek.

Ø  Participate fully in all discussions and complete all readings and assignments.

Ø  Complete and document experience hours on Experience Supervision Forms each week, obtaining all required signatures and providing the instructor with a copy.

Ø  Participate in behavior analytic activities while being observed by the faculty supervisor. Whenever possible, observations will occur in the natural environment. When this is not possible, students will be observed via video.

Ø  Upon completion of the semester, document experience on Experience Verification form, obtaining all requiredsignatures.

Meeting Format

Students will participate in two weekly meetings. One weekly meeting will be small-group format(up to 5 students) led by the faculty supervisor, and the second weekly meeting will be an individual meeting with only the student and faculty supervisor.

During each supervision period (supervision period = 1 week), students must complete 25 hrs. of experience, and 2.5 hours of direct supervision (1.25 hours small group and 1.25 hours individual). See below for specific BACB© requirements regarding experience hours.

BACB© Requirements

Ø  Practicum setting requirements: students must be working in an environment where they are acquiring new behavior-analytic skills related to the BACB© Fourth Edition Task List©. Students must provide the instructor with the name of the site, a general description of activities that will be performed, and the name and contact information for an on-site supervisor. The instructor will then determine if the site is an appropriate environment to complete the Intensive Practicum. See below for specific requirements regarding appropriate activities, from the BACB© website:

Activities must be consistent with the dimensions of applied behavior analysis identified by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968) in their article “Some Current Dimensions of Applied Behavior Analysis” published in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. The faculty supervisor will determine if experience activities qualify based on these sources.

*No more than 50% of the total accrued experience hours can be in the direct implementation of behavioral programs*

Ø  Appropriate clients: Clients with whom students are working must meet the following requirements, from the BACB© website:

Clients may be any persons for whom behavior-analytic services are appropriate. However, the supervisee may not be related to the client or the client’s primary caretaker or be the client’s primary caretaker. Supervisees must work with multiple clients during Page 3 of 8 BACB Experience Standards – ver. 11/1/2016 the experience period. (Also, see the following relevant

sections of the BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts: 1.06, 1.07, 2.0,

Eligibility

Students must meet the following eligibility requirements in order to take Intensive Practicum:

  • Be enrolled in one of Northeastern University’s graduate programs in ABA OR be a graduate of one of Northeastern University’s graduate programs in ABA.
  • Complete an online training module required by the BACB©
  • Work in an appropriate setting (see above)
  • Work with appropriate clients (see above)
  • If participating in person, student must be able to be observed by faculty at site. If participating remotely, student must have permission to videotape work withclients/students.

Intensive Practicum 1 Learning Objectives:

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Define and provide examples of basic behavioral principles in an applied setting.
  2. Identify various methods of preference and reinforcer assessments, provide a rationale for the use of these methods of assessment, conduct assessment procedures, and interpret assessment results.
  3. Use prompts and prompt fading to teach new behavior, within task analysis or other teaching procedures.
  4. Design, implement, and monitor skill acquisition programs, including discrete trial teaching and task analysis with students or clients.
  5. Display and interpret skill acquisition data to determine effects ofintervention.
  6. Describe the ethical and professional standards of professional Behavior Analysts.

Intensive Practicum 2 L`earning Objectives:

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Define and provide examples of basic behavioral principles in an applied setting.
  2. Identify various indirect and direct functional assessment procedures, provide a rationale for the use of these methods of assessment, and conduct functional assessmentprocedures.
  3. Interpret functional assessment data to develop a functionally-appropriate behavior reduction program.
  4. Design, implement, and monitor behavior change procedures with students orclients.
  5. Display and interpret behavior change data to determine effects ofintervention.
  6. Define and provide examples of unconditioned and conditioned reinforcement. Design areinforcement program that uses conditioned reinforcers to increase socially significantbehavior.
  7. Describe the ethical and professional standards of professional BehaviorAnalysts.

Grading/Evaluation Standards

A passing grade in Intensive Practicum is achieved by:

Experience Hours. Successful completion and documentation of supervised practicum hours (25 hours of experience per week; 2.5 hours of supervision per week).

Discussion. Participation in weekly discussions in both small-group and individual meetings.

Assignments. Successful completion of all scheduled assignments. Each module includes two assignments.

Weekly Notes. Maintenance of weekly field notes documenting activities performed that reflect behavior analytic work. Students bring field notes to individual meetings and review with instructor.

Observation & Feedback. Students will be observed conducting behavior analytic activities with a client in the natural environment during each observation period (observation period = 1 week) by the faculty supervisor. Whenever possible, observations will occur in the natural environment.

When this is not possible, students will be observed via video.

Presentation. At the conclusion of each module, students will develop a formal presentation (20- 30 minutes) in which they present their completed assignments, including an introduction to the topic, description of the intervention/assessment, results (including a graph), and interpretation of results. Presentation software such as Powerpoint will be used.

Methods of Assessment

Specific methods of evaluation used across courses:

  • Quiz responses (multiple choice and short answer)
  • Exam responses (short answer and essay)
  • Responses on the Discussion Board (graded using a rubric)
  • Presentations (graded using a rubric)
  • Paper (analytic and literature review)

In addition to the above methods of evaluation, the Professional Portfolio is the capstone for the Applied Behavior Analysis Programs. This portfolio documents the student’s behavioral competency in critical clinical skills, including preference and reinforcer assessment, functional assessment, conditioned reinforcement, task analysis, and intervention. The portfolio is reviewed by multiple instructors.

Use of Assessment for Program Improvement

The following assessment results are used to inform the program’s instructional content:

  1. Student performance on evaluations (quizzes, exams, discussions, presentations and papers)
  2. Student responses on mid-semester surveys, TRACE evaluations, and program exit survey
  3. Student GPA across courses
  4. Graduation rate from program
  5. Student pass rate on the BCBA exam upon completion of the program

Program faculty review the above assessment results and implement changes accordingly. During the 2015-2016 academic year, the following changes were made as a result of program assessments:

  • Added SAFMEDS (Say All Words Fast for One Minute Every Day) to CAEP 6327 Behavior Assessment to help increase understanding of basic concepts in applied behavior analysis.
  • Modified the final exam for CAEP 6327 Behavior Assessment.
  • Added ePortfolio requirement to CAEP 8417 Intensive Practicum 1 and CAEP 8418 Intensive Practicum 2.
  • Added BDS (Behavior Development Solutions) online study modules to CAEP 6324 Program Learning to help students prepare for the BCBA exam.
  • Provided CAEP 8417 Intensive Practicum students with a template to complete exercises, including Preference Assessment and Conditioned Reinforcement.
  • Added synchronous video discussions to CAEP 6331 Advanced Learning 1, CAEP 6332 Advanced Learning 2, and CAEP 6336 Systematic Inquiry 1.
  • Modified CAEP 6335 Applied Programming 2 content.

College Student Development and Counseling Program

Learning Objectives for students participating in the College Student Development and Counseling Program

Upon completion of the College Student Development and Counseling Program of Northeastern University students should be able to:

  • Plan and implement programs and services which address the cognitive, psychosocial, and health and wellness needs of college students that contribute to student retention and student satisfaction with their college experience.
  • Promote student involvement on campus therefore contributing to student retention.
  • Contribute to college wide academic or student affairs committees and task forces and provide perspectives on student development, student engagement and student learning.
  • Be agents of cultural and diversity inclusion on college campuses.
  • Utilize a wide range of approaches to assess student learning and development as well as program and service delivery.
  • Utilize current research in the field to inform their practice in student affairs administration.
  • Be marketable in various functional areas of student affairs and academic affairs in varying institutional types (4 year private, 4 year public, 2 year private, etc.) in varying locations (urban, rural, etc.).

Program Objectives for the College Student Development and Counseling Program

To provide a comprehensive curriculum which addresses counseling, student development, student health and wellness and higher education administration.

  • To require practicum experiences that offer quality experiential learning experiences with solid learning objectives.
  • To utilize Northeastern University’s Boston location which provides a diversity of experiential learning opportunities through graduate assistantships and practicums which takes place on a wide variety of higher education institutional types in the region.
  • To offer national experiential learning experiences through summer internships on college campuses across the United States through such professional associations as the Association of College and University Housing Officers-International and the National Orientation Directors Association.
  • To encourage student participation in global study abroad experiences, usually in the summer, where they visit countries such as Ghana, England, Italy, and Ireland.
  • To develop a strong and supportive student cohort group each year which includes a very active College Student Development Association.
  • To encourage student participation in national, regional and local professional associations as administrators, conference/workshop planners, conference presenters.

MS School Psychology

  1. Students will have strong professional identity and comport themselves in a highly professional manner.
  2. Students will develop competence in a wide range of assessment approaches.
  3. Students will develop competence in counseling and related mental health interventions.
  4. Students will develop competence in consultation and collaboration.
  5. Students will develop competence in strategies to prevent the occurrence of problems.
  6. Students will be knowledgeable about ethical and legal issues pertaining to school psychology, and abide by professional ethics and act in lawful ways.
  7. Students will be knowledgeable about culture and diversity, and be sensitive and respectful to issues relating to culture and diversity.
  8. Students will develop competence in program evaluation and applied research.
  9. Students will develop competence in oral and written communication, as well as information technology.

MSCP Counseling Psychology

  1. To train students in the field of mental health counseling
  2. To prepare students to become Licensed Mental Health Counselors in Massachusetts and other states
  3. Prepare students to meet the pre-master’s degree clinical licensing requirements
  4. To prepare students to enter a variety of mental health counseling settings

PhD Counseling Psychology

Goal #1

To prepare graduates for the role of professional psychologists, to include advanced skill development in behavioral observations, interviewing, psychological assessment, counseling and treatment planning and practice, consultation, effective use of supervision and an understanding of and commitment to the profession’s ethical codes.

Objective 1A:  Students will be exposed to various professional roles including student teaching, participation in research projects where they are mentored by faculty and mentor peers and/or junior colleagues.

Competency 1A1:  Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding of their roles as clinicians.
Competency 1A2:  Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding of their roles as educators.
Competency 1A3:  Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding of their roles as community change agents ethically serving diverse populations and advocating for social justice.
Competency 1A4:  Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding of their roles as researchers.

Goal #2

To foster understanding and application of the scientific basis of clinical practice in psychotherapy and clinical assessment

Objective 2A:  Students will acquire an understanding of the biological, cognitive and affective, and social aspects of behavior.
Objective 2B: Students will acquire knowledge of the history and systems of psychology
Objective 2C:  Students will acquire knowledge of empirical research regarding effective clinical practice, assessment, and interventions.
Objective 2D: Students will acquire knowledge of contemporary theories that explicate human behavior across the lifespan.
Objective 2E: Students will study current evidenced based practices in psychotherapy, psychological testing, and biological bases of clinical practice.
Objective 2F: Students will acquire knowledge and skills to implement evidence-based clinical interventions with diverse populations.

Competency 2A: Students will understand the regulation of biological and emotional functions of the nervous system.
Competency 2B: Students will understand the contribution of environmental factors to brain development, to the development of the mind, and to their functions.
Competency 2C: Students will understand theories and research with respect to clinical efficacy.
Competency 2D: Students will understand contemporary theories of human behavior from a lifespan developmental perspective.
Competency 2E1: Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding of current evidence based practices in psychotherapy, psychological testing, and the neuroscientific bases of clinical practice.
Competency 2E2: Students will develop the ability to select and apply evidence-based interventions and to assess progress and outcomes.
Competency 2F1: Students will demonstrate that they are familiar with outcome research for various intervention strategies.
Competency 2F2: Students will develop the ability to implement a wide range of developmental, preventive, remedial, and psychoeducational interventions, including psychotherapy, crisis management, consultation and dealing with emergency psychological/psychiatric situations with people across sources of difference.

Goal # 3

To produce graduates who possess advanced and applied research skills within an ecological perspective

Objective 3A:  Students will be involved in course work on advanced and applied research skills.
Objective 3B: Students will become proficient in reporting research findings.
Objective 3C: Students will be able to critically evaluate research from an ecological perspective.

Competency 3A1:  Students will demonstrate competency in research design and data analysis related to health and illness using quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods models.
Competency 3A2: Students will be able to develop meaningful research questions, based upon theories and models in the scholarly research literature.
Competency 3A3:  Students will be able to implement appropriate research design, methods, and statistical analyses, consistent with the research questions.
Competency 3A4: Students will understand advantages and disadvantages of various research designs, modes of inquiry, data collection methods, statistical procedures, and measurement concepts.
Competency 3B:  Students will demonstrate the ability to report their research investigations appropriately, including knowledge of the socio-cultural contexts in the interpretation of the data.
Competency 3C1: Students will demonstrate the ability to evaluate and critically assess the methodology of empirical research and the validity of research conclusions within a multicultural/ecological perspective.
Competency 3C2:  Students will be able to integrate themselves in research projects on research teams that stress a multicultural/ecological perspective.
Competency 3C3:  Students will successfully complete their dissertation proposals grounded within a multicultural/ecological perspective.

Goal # 4

To produce graduates who are committed to and demonstrate ethical practice as counseling psychologists.

Objective 4A: Students will learn through courses, mentoring, and supervision in the ethical codes of the profession.
Objective 4B: Student will learn through courses and supervised clinical experiences, local, state, and national laws affecting professional psychological practice.

Competency 4A: Students will become competent in understanding the codes of ethics and professional conduct of APA and develop a competent ethical decision-making process.
Competency 4B: Students will demonstrate understanding of the legal issues affecting practice and resolution of ethical/legal conflicts that may occur.

Goal #5

To produce graduates who are multiculturally competent across sources of difference, including race, ethnicity, gender, class, religion/spirituality, disability, and sexual orientation, in both clinical and research settings.

Objective 5A: Students will study, be mentored in, and be exposed to multicultural perspectives that stress the understanding of different worldviews and confronting forms of oppression.

Competency 5A1: Students will be able to integrate multiple worldviews and important historical and political positions in their clinical and research activities.
Competency 5A2: Students will be able to understand their own positions of privilege, related to race, gender, social class, ability, and/or sexual orientation and its effect on their work as professional psychologists.
Competency 5A3: Students will be able to integrate and actively advocate for the elimination of racism, sexism, class oppression, homophobia, ageism, and other forms of oppression.
Competency 5A4: Students will be able to conceptualize and advocate for social and economic justice as professional psychologists.

Goal # 6

To advance the field of counseling psychology using program strengths: (a) an interdisciplinary and interprofessional approach to clinical services provision and enhancement of the science of health promotion and health psychology; (b) stress on urban, community-based interventions using an ecological approach.

Objective 6A: Students will be exposed to interprofessional models of health promotion research within the Bouvé College of Health Sciences.
Objective 6B: Students will study the strengths and challenges facing urban populations and work within health promotion and prevention.

Competency 6A1: Students will develop an understanding of how health promotion research is conceptualized and undertaken by an interprofessional team.
Competency 6B1: Students will understand the unique challenges facing urban populations and work within settings that provide health promotion and prevention efforts with multicultural populations.

PhD School Psychology

Goal #1: To produce graduates with knowledge of the basic areas of psychology.

Student Learning Objectives for Goal #1:
1-1: Students will acquire knowledge of the biological, cognitive, affective and social aspects of behavior.
1-2. Students will acquire an understanding of the historical and philosophical influences on psychology, including school psychology.
1-3. Students will acquire knowledge of typical and atypical human development with a focus on children and adolescents.

Competencies Expected for these Objectives:
1-1a. Students will demonstrate knowledge of biological bases of behavior.
1-1b. Students will demonstrate knowledge of cognitive and affective bases of behavior. 1-1c. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the social aspects of behavior.
2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the history and systems of psychology.
3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of typical and atypical human development with a focus on children and adolescents.

Goal #2: To produce graduates who are competent in research and scholarship.

Student Learning Objectives for Goal #2:
2-1 : Students will acquire the ability to critically evaluate the research of others.
2-2 : Students will acquire knowledge and demonstrate skills in research design and statistics including effective communication of research findings.

Competencies Expected for these Objectives:
2-1 : Students will demonstrate the ability to formulate meaningful research questions based upon a broad critical review of the extant literature and to relate their own findings to extant literature. 2-2a. Students will demonstrate competence in research design (group and single case) and program evaluation methods, taking into consideration threats to internal and external validity in addition to ethical considerations.
2-2 b. Students will demonstrate knowledge of a wide variety of statistical methods, including assumptions and limitations of each approach, and will be able to select appropriate analyses given their research questions.
2-2c. Students will demonstrate knowledge of traditional and modern test theory (e.g., reliability, validity, factor analysis, and item response theory).

Goal #3: To produce graduates who use a systematic, problem-solving approach in the practice of psychology.

Student Learning Objectives for Goal #3:
3-1 : Students will acquire skills in the appropriate selection and administration of assessment procedures taking into consideration contextual factors.
3-2 : Students will acquire skills in the interpretation and integration of assessment findings from multiple sources and will use these data to make recommendations that are evidence-based and culturally sensitive.
3-3. Students will acquire skills in the ability to implement, monitor and evaluate evidence-based, culturally sensitive interventions.
3-4. Students will acquire skills in the provision of consultation at the individual, group and systems levels.
3-5. Students will acquire skills in the provision of prevention services.

Competencies Expected for these Objectives:
3-1. Students will demonstrate the appropriate selection and administration of assessment procedures taking into consideration contextual factors.
3-2. Students will demonstrate the ability to accurately integrate and interpret assessment findings from multiple sources and will use these data to make recommendations that are evidence-based and culturally sensitive.
3-3. Students will demonstrate the ability to implement, monitor and evaluate evidence-based, culturally sensitive interventions.
3-4. Students will demonstrate the ability to provide consultation at the individual, group and systems levels.
3-5. Students will demonstrate the ability to provide prevention services.

Goal #4: To produce graduates with the awareness, sensitivity, and skills in working with diverse individuals, groups and communities, who represent various cultural and personal backgrounds and characteristics defined broadly.

Student Learning Objectives for Goal #4:
4-1: Students will acquire an understanding of culture and diversity as it relates to understanding themselves and others in their practice and research.
Competencies Expected for these Objectives:
4-1a. Students will monitor and apply knowledge of themselves as cultural beings in assessment, intervention, consultation and research.
4-1b. Students will apply knowledge of others as cultural beings in assessment, intervention, consultation and research.
4-1c. Students will apply knowledge of the role of culture in their interactions with diverse others in assessment, intervention, consultation and research.

Goal #5: To produce graduates with the knowledge and skills to engage in research and practice that is ethically and legally appropriate.

Student Learning Objectives for Goal #5:
5-1. Students will acquire an understanding of ethical guidelines and federal and state laws as
they apply to research and practice of psychology.

Student Learning Objectives for Goal #5:
5-1. Students will acquire an understanding of ethical guidelines and federal and state laws as they apply to research and practice of psychology.

Competencies Expected for these Objectives:
5-1a. Students will demonstrate that they know and follow APA’s and NASP’s professional standards and ethical guidelines in their research and practice.
5-1b. Students will demonstrate that they know and follow relevant federal and state laws and regulations in their research and practice.