November 9

Why does this professor have 20 bulging suitcases piled in her room?

When Northeastern students visit Ghana each summer for a month-long course to compare healthcare and education systems, they do more than learn about nationalized healthcare and the role of traditional medicine—they also give back in a big way.

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November 1

Do more guns lead to more fatal police shootings?

Police are more likely to shoot civilians in states with high rates of gun ownership, according to a new study by researchers from Northeastern and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “The take-home message from the study is that when people live in places where guns are more prevalent, the police officers are more likely to shoot and kill them,” said co-author Matthew Miller, a professor of health sciences at Northeastern.

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October 26

They fled from war and landed in a new form of hell

“It just breaks your heart,” said Andrew Driscoll, N ’19, a nursing major who spent his most recent co-op working with children in the notorious Moria refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos.

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October 26

A passion for bringing healthcare to the disenfranchised

As a nursing student, Celsea Tibbitt, PhD ’21, found her calling while working with the homeless in Boston and confronting infant mortality in Africa. Praising her respectful demeanor with patients and dedication to health equity, her mentor said Tibbett embodies “all that is good about health care.”

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October 26

A new strategy for reducing opioid relapse

Relapse is one of the most daunting challenges in the escalating opioid crisis. Pharmacy professor Barbara Waszczak is exploring ways to harness nanomedicine to deliver medications to neuro-receptors in the brain that will reduce drug craving.

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October 26

Pharmacy grad’s knack for science communication leads to unusual career path

After spending years in the lab, Abhijit Kulkarni, PharmD ’16, used his talent for explaining complex science to land an unusual job with one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies.

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October 26

Physical therapy grad spotted a need, then invented the solution

Sometimes it requires the eye and experience of a frontline health professional to spot a problem and devise the solution. Haley Waud, DPT ’13, exemplifies the innovation ethos at Bouvé, creating an invention to help her physical therapy patients, then starting a consulting company to help others bring their brainchildren to market.

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October 26

An unexpected detour

How does a public health major with no experience in technology land a plumb job with a Boston health tech company? “You need to be willing to bet on yourself,” said Binja Basimike, MPH ’14.

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October 26

This is where health care innovation begins

During his first week of school Danny Kim, PharmD ’22, cancelled a date to listen to a lecture on the myth of genius. The result was his latest passion—creation of the Bouvé Innovators Club, where students in healthcare, science, engineering, and business bring their divergent expertise to promote healthcare innovation.

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October 26

Student publishes in medical journal as an undergraduate

While still an undergraduate Patrick Sheedy, HS ’19, has embraced the extremes of what experiential learning has to offer, becoming first author on a paper published in a national medical journal and providing care to a man who was about to lose his toes to frostbite.

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October 26

Family history in her bones

In this op-ed, physical therapy professor Danielle Levac recalls the complex emotional moment when she realized that her genetic bone condition had been passed on to her daughter.

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October 22

No benefit seen from antipsychotics used in delirious hospital patients

When the world’s leading business newspaper needed expert commentary on a controversial intensive care treatment, they turned to Northeastern’ John Devlin, a pharmacy professor who recently led the international committee that rewrote treatment guidelines for ICU care. Devlin told The Wall Street Journal that hospitals should “absolutely stop” the practice of using antipsychotic medicine on patients suffering from delirium.

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