July 22

She battled her way out of adversity, and now she’s helping others do the same

Nicolle Potvin earned a master’s degree in counseling psychology so she could help others find their way out of the tunnel of self-defeating behavior.

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July 15

The top mentor at the nation’s top children’s hospital—clinical education doesn’t get any better

Cidney Moscovitch needed more direct patient experience to enter Northeastern’s physician assistant program. She got that experience and much more by earning her graduate certificate in exercise science.

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July 11

Take a virtual tour of the arboretum on Northeastern’s Boston campus

Located in the heart of Boston, Northeastern’s campus has been officially designated as an arboretum, with more than 1,400 trees representing 143 different species.

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July 11

How two high school friends became Instagram food guides

While earning her master’s in public health, Rachel Eng, MPH'21, teamed up with a friend from high school to become an Instagram food guide with more than 18,000 followers.

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July 2

What do a robotic teddy bear and a wearable biosensor have in common?

Research by personal health informatics professor Matthew Goodwin finds ways to ease anxiety in hospitalized children and predict aggressive behavior in youth with autism.

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June 24

When we discuss the opioid crisis, the words we use matter

Leo Beletsky, a professor of health sciences and law, has teamed up with journalist Zachary Siegel, to change the way we talk about the opioid crisis. As members of Northeastern University’s Health in Justice Action Lab, they contend that the words we use to describe the issue can have a profound impact on healthcare policy.

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June 13

She created a cookbook to help people heal

Bouvé alum Dayna Altman, MPH’18, plans to publish a cookbook that combines baking recipes with stories of personal hardships. Her goal is to destigmatize mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety.

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June 11

How can this researcher’s video game short-circuit dating violence?

Three innovative Northeastern research initiatives aim to teach teenage boys and girls how to avoid dating violence.

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June 6

Our next healthcare crisis will be in the home—are we prepared?

Home healthcare is the wave of the future, but the demand for practitioners is already outstripping the supply. Northeastern is on the case.

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May 31

A nine-hour road trip produces new insights into physical therapy

Seven professors and four students gained new perspectives on physical therapy at the world’s largest international PT conference in Geneva, Switzerland.

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May 28

Personal resilience was the key to success for this physician assistant

Persistence, resilience, and a global perspective on healthcare made it possible for this alumnus to achieve his dreams.

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May 24

Ultrasound conference will teach frontline practitioners to save lives

Every three days, another young athlete dies suddenly from heart conditions that could have been detected with breakthrough portable ultrasound devices. Northeastern will hold a symposium June 1 to train frontline practitioners.

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May 15

How you store your guns matters. It could save lives.

A study by Northeastern professor Mathew Miller, published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics, revealed that gun deaths among young people could be significantly decreased if more gun owners locked up their firearms.

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May 10

When is a Fitbit like a New Year’s resolution?

Wearable devices are all the rage in the fight to control obesity and related diseases. But they have not lived up to their potential, according to a team of Northeastern researchers, because their current design fails to encourage meaningful reflection on the data they produce.

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May 7

Global experiences led this student to embrace the resilience of the human spirit

Adrienne Peng, BHS’19, was named a Presidential Global Fellow for embodying Northeastern’s identity as a global university that fosters cultural competency.

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May 6

Commencement 2019

See the photos. Watch the Video. Read about the keynote by New York Times best-selling author Tara Westover. It’s all here.

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May 2

Policing public health

Prescription drug monitoring programs that were created to help control the opioid epidemic are actually hindering the fight, according to Leo Beletsky, a professor of Health Sciences and the Law. In a free ranging interview, he explains his position to The Appeal News, a national publication specializing in criminal justice.

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May 2

He only tweets two words. He has 50,000 followers.

James Heathers, a post-doc researcher in Health Sciences, found a humorous way to express his frustration with the state of science journalism, and it clearly resonated among both scientists and patients.

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May 1

Being a first-generation American gives her an edge as a school psychologist

When Karen Alvarez’s parents fled the brutal civil war in El Salvador, they never imagined their daughter would earn two graduate degrees from a prestigious American university.

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April 30

As a professional athlete, she took a pounding; now she helps others overcome their injuries

After physical therapy saved her international skiing career, Brittany Loweree played it forward by becoming a PT herself.

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April 26

Why did this nursing student also study experience design?

While completing her nurse practitioner degree, Rachel Abarbanel earned a graduate certificate in experience design so that she can make healthcare less intimidating for patients.

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April 26

Do you know the warning signs of human trafficking?

Human trafficking is the fastest-growing organized crime operation in the United States—a multi-billion-dollar industry worldwide that traps tens-of-thousands of people in the U.S. They work under slave-like conditions in agriculture, construction, domestic work, and the sex trade. The Bouvé College of Health Sciences is taking the lead in fighting this scourge by training frontline workers in healthcare, law enforcement, and engineering to spot the warning signs of trafficking.

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April 16

What’s that ringing in my ear?

Tinnitus, or “phantom ear noise,” plagues 50 million Americans and is the number one cause of disability among veterans. Yet research on popular sound therapy treatments “remains muddled,” according to Devon Kulinski, a doctoral student in audiology.

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April 10

Bouvé students take a starring role at RISE research expo

One student discovered a new pathway for treating inflammatory bowel disease, while others explored ways to improve health education, prevent toddler injuries, and decrease the amount of anesthesia needed during operations.

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April 8

Blending mindfulness with traditional healthcare

Northeastern’s emphasis on inter-professional teamwork is a perfect fit for Melanie Black, a nursing student with a background in mindfulness and yoga.

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April 3

Northeastern’s nursing anesthesia program ranks #1

In many hospitals, nurses rather than doctors, handle anesthesia. So by ranking as best in the country, Northeastern’s nurse anesthesia program is ensuring the safety of operating rooms nationwide.

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March 27

A simple fix that could save lives in the ICU

Sometimes the most effective innovation springs from those who work on the frontlines and experience the challenges of emergency healthcare every day. That’s why it is so important to train nurses as innovators, according to Karen Giuliano, Executive Director of Innovation at the Bouvé School of Nursing. Giuliano developed a simple 3D printed device that can reduce the frequency of IV medication errors.

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March 25

Investigating suicides and murders: co-op with the coroner’s office is never routine

“Co-op is a great way to find out if what you think you want to do, is really what you want," said Justine Newman, HS’20.

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March 22

‘It’s a chronic illness, rather than a moral failure’

In 2017, more than 47,600 Americans—130 per day—died from opioid overdoses. Pharmacy professor Alyssa Peckham, who is also an addiction specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital, says we need to focus more on improving access to treatment.

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February 22

Online psychology program ranked “most unique” in the nation

Northeastern’s master’s program in Applied Behavioral Analysis was recently ranked among the top ABA programs in the country.

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February 19

Can this professor’s technology help create an army of efficient cancer killers?

Pharmacy professor Tali Konry is creating a technology designed to allow researchers to re-engineer immune cells to kill specific kinds of cancer.

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February 19

‘When situations like this happen, we need everybody to help’

A simulated spinal injury on the ice at Matthews Arena gives Bouvé students an opportunity to work in interprofessional emergency teams, according to physical therapy professor Steve Clark.

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February 15

Measles vaccines don’t just protect you, they protect everyone around you

When you refuse to vaccinate yourself or your child, you threaten the lives of anyone with a serious medical condition or compromised immune system, according to Brandon Dionne, a professor of pharmacy and health system sciences.

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February 15

Does having a gun at home really make you safer?

Far from protecting you, having a gun in your home dramatically increases the odds that someone in your household will be shot or commit suicide, according to research by Bouvé health sciences professor Matt Miller.

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February 8

What if you had a medical emergency during physical therapy and your PT wasn’t trained to deal with it?

Kristin Greenwood wins a national Distinguished Educator award for curriculum reform in acute care physical therapy

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February 8

Advocating for those who are often left on the sidelines

Dean Susan Parish talks about her award-winning research on health equity for women and children with intellectual disabilities.

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February 1

A passion for healthcare and a mind for business

One advantage of being a student in a small program within a big university is that when your career plans change, you can adjust your academic path without missing a beat. Just ask Kelly Szaniawski.

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January 25

A week in Ecuador that changes lives on two continents

For 13 years, professor Lorna Hayward has taught cultural competency to physical therapy students by taking them to orphanages in Ecuador. Her sustained commitment has produced remarkable results.

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January 25

She’s studying the detriments of digitally altered photos

Applied psychology professor Rachel Rodgers appeared on NBC’s The Today Show to discuss the detrimental impact digitally altered photos have on our self-esteem and perception of our bodies.

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January 25

To solve the opioid crisis, we need to think about it differently

The inaccurate language commonly used by journalists and policy makers when discussing opioid abuse is a major impediment to meaningful solutions, according to Leo Beletsky, a professor of health sciences and law. That’s why Beletsky and doctoral student Zachary Siegel are writing “Change the Narrative,” a guide for healthcare professionals, journalists, policymakers, and lawyers.

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January 25

Are middle men driving up the cost of prescription drugs?

When pharmacies turned to independent companies to handle their billing, the goal was to cut costs—but the opposite is happening, according to Bouvé pharmacy professor Todd Brown, who is executive director of the Massachusetts Independent Pharmacists Association. Brown talked with Boston 25 News about the growing pricing crisis.

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January 10

‘Northeastern was a lifesaver for me’

After fleeing Haiti and climbing out of poverty, an alumni couple pays it forward by creating a scholarship for underrepresented healthcare students.

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January 10

Two Bouvé profs among top 1% of researchers worldwide

Two Bouvé professors, both from the School of Pharmacy, rank among the top 1 percent of researchers worldwide based on citations to their work in scholarly publications. Mansoor Amiji made the list for his research on novel drug delivery systems for treating cancer, while Vladimir Torchilin was named for his work on precision drug delivery that reduces side effects of chemotherapy. Six professors from Northeastern made the list.

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January 8

A potential game changer for families affected by autism

A $3.1 million study in Maine, Rhode Island, and Pennsylvania will test the ability of wearable devices to predict aggressive outbursts by people with autism. The watches, developed by health sciences professor Matthew Goodwin, track the patient’s vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure, etc.) to anticipate rising anxiety levels before they reach the boiling point.

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January 3

‘Don’t wait for the perfect time; you will be waiting forever.’

Sean O’Neill never envisioned himself as an entrepreneur, but when the PharmD alum saw the number of medication errors being made in his Philadelphia hospital, he formed a technology company to solve the problem.

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December 20

Troubled veterans favor voluntary gun control that could save their lives

Veterans favor voluntary gun control measures that would reduce the risk of suicide.

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December 13

Is citizen science the key to environmental justice?

With the EPA under siege and industrial regulation in full retreat, the work of health science professor Sara Wylie has become more relevant than ever. Wylie is a pioneer in the field of citizen science, a movement dedicated to empowering ordinary citizens to conduct environmental monitoring in their communities.

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December 10

Professor discovers a way to help premature infants thrive in the hospital

Infants suck more frequently when looking at a picture of a woman’s face—a discovery that could help premature infants improve their feeding skills, according to a new study published by communication sciences professor Emily Zimmerman.

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December 6

Looking where others have not

Professor Ganesh Thakur hopes that his new patent will pave the way for new medicines to treat opioid addiction and a host of other diseases. The key, he says, lies in an unexplored portion of the brain receptor that’s activated by marijuana.

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November 29

How can a soap opera help fight AIDS?

Harnessing the power of storytelling, Nursing professor Rachel Jones has released a 12-part soap opera aimed at preventing AIDS by exploring issues faced by four young African-American women as they navigate the challenges of modern relationships. Interwoven in their dramatic stories are a variety of HIV-related issues, including condoms, cheating, HIV testing, multiple partners, drug use—and most of all, self-image.

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November 29

Preparation and Recovery, Red Sox trainer talks about the 2018 World Series

One key to becoming a champion is being prepared for the unexpected. No one expected Game 3 of the 2018 World Series last 18 innings stretched for more than 7 hours. As a team trainer, Northeastern’s Adam Thomas played a key role in the Red Sox ability emerge as champions after suffering grueling defeat in the longest game in World Series history.

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November 27

Undergraduate research changed their outlook on what a nursing career can be

By the end of their second year as undergraduate nursing students, Rachel Solomon and Abigail Caron were presenting their research at a national conference in Seattle. “People at the conference kept asking where we were in grad school, and we kept on telling them, ‘No, we’re sophomores at Northeastern,’” said Caron.

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November 25

Why does this professor have 20 bulging suitcases piled in her room?

When Northeastern students visit Ghana each summer for a month-long course to compare healthcare and education systems, they do more than learn about nationalized healthcare and the role of traditional medicine—they also give back in a big way.

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November 23

Family history in her bones

In this op-ed, physical therapy professor Danielle Levac recalls the complex emotional moment when she realized that her genetic bone condition had been passed on to her daughter.

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November 21

A passion for bringing healthcare to the disenfranchised

As a nursing student, Celsea Tibbitt, PhD ’21, found her calling while working with the homeless in Boston and confronting infant mortality in Africa. Praising her respectful demeanor with patients and dedication to health equity, her mentor said Tibbett embodies “all that is good about health care.”

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November 19

They fled from war and landed in a new form of hell

“It just breaks your heart,” said Andrew Driscoll, N ’19, a nursing major who spent his most recent co-op working with children in the notorious Moria refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos.

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November 17

A new strategy for reducing opioid relapse

Relapse is one of the most daunting challenges in the escalating opioid crisis. Pharmacy professor Barbara Waszczak is exploring ways to harness nanomedicine to deliver medications to neuro-receptors in the brain that will reduce drug craving.

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November 15

An unexpected detour

How does a public health major with no experience in technology land a plumb job with a Boston health tech company? “You need to be willing to bet on yourself,” said Binja Basimike, MPH ’14.

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November 13

Physical therapy grad spotted a need, then invented the solution

Sometimes it requires the eye and experience of a frontline health professional to spot a problem and devise the solution. Haley Waud, DPT ’13, exemplifies the innovation ethos at Bouvé, creating an invention to help her physical therapy patients, then starting a consulting company to help others bring their brainchildren to market.

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November 11

Students bring healthcare to patients who walk miles for medicine

For health sciences major Rani Viroga, the defining moment of her week-long service trip to Nicaragua came when a patient thanked her doctor after having several teeth removed without Novocain. As president of Northeastern’s Global Medical Brigade, Viroga organizes fellow students to provide health services to underprivileged communities in Panama, Nicaragua, and Honduras.

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November 9

Do more guns lead to more fatal police shootings?

Police are more likely to shoot civilians in states with high rates of gun ownership, according to a new study by researchers from Northeastern and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “The take-home message from the study is that when people live in places where guns are more prevalent, the police officers are more likely to shoot and kill them,” said co-author Matthew Miller, a professor of health sciences at Northeastern.

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November 7

Pharmacy grad’s knack for science communication leads to unusual career path

After spending years in the lab, Abhijit Kulkarni, PharmD ’16, used his talent for explaining complex science to land an unusual job with one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies.

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November 5

No benefit seen from antipsychotics used in delirious hospital patients

When the world’s leading business newspaper needed expert commentary on a controversial intensive care treatment, they turned to Northeastern’ John Devlin, a pharmacy professor who recently led the international committee that rewrote treatment guidelines for ICU care. Devlin told The Wall Street Journal that hospitals should “absolutely stop” the practice of using antipsychotic medicine on patients suffering from delirium.

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November 3

Clearing up misconceptions about gun violence could make suicide attempts less deadly

When we talk about gun violence in the United States, we talk about homicides. But there are roughly twice as many suicides as homicides every year, and more than half of them involve guns. Most people have no idea that suicide is the most common type of violent death, according to a new study by Northeastern health sciences.

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November 1

This is where health care innovation begins

During his first week of school Danny Kim, PharmD ’22, cancelled a date to listen to a lecture on the myth of genius. The result was his latest passion—creation of the Bouvé Innovators Club, where students in healthcare, science, engineering, and business bring their divergent expertise to promote healthcare innovation.

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October 31

Student publishes in medical journal as an undergraduate

While still an undergraduate Patrick Sheedy, HS ’19, has embraced the extremes of what experiential learning has to offer, becoming first author on a paper published in a national medical journal and providing care to a man who was about to lose his toes to frostbite.

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