For information and resources regarding returning to campus and COVID-19 please visit the university COVID-19 website

Category News
Home

News

-

Page 2

17 Jun

CNY suburbs rally against racial injustice: ‘Never shut up’

Protesters held signs that said “Silence is Violence” and “Justice will not be served until those who are unaffected are as outraged as those who are.” The speakers at Sunday’s rally asked the mostly white people in the crowd to count the number of black colleagues in their offices.

READ MORE
17 Jun

Masterclass: Healthcare funding during the COVID Crisis- Trends & Predictions

A question-and-answer session moderated by Carmen Sceppa, MD, PhD, dean of the Bouvé College of Health Sciences. Sceppa’s work focuses on healthy aging and health promotion—two areas that she is seeing through a new lens during the pandemic.

READ MORE
17 Jun

Racism, coronavirus, and African Americans

Heavy. Overwhelming. Daunting. Those were some of the words used at a recent panel to describe the two crises disproportionately affecting the black community right now: the novel coronavirus and the unjust killing of African Americans by white police officers. “You feel like it’s compounded to the point where you wonder: How do we get out from under?”

READ MORE
4 Jun

Handgun ownership associated with much higher suicide risk

Men who own handguns are eight times more likely to die of gun suicides than men who don’t own handguns, and women who own handguns are 35 times more likely than women who don’t...

READ MORE
4 Jun

First-Time Gun Owners at Risk for Suicide, Major Study Confirms

By linking gun purchases to the voter registry and suicide data, the team was able to track individuals over time, from October 2004 to December 2016. The researchers checked gun purchases back to 1985 to make sure that individuals in the study were in fact first-time buyers.

READ MORE
4 Jun

Handgun Ownership and Suicide in California

Research has consistently identified firearm availability as a risk factor for suicide. However, existing studies are relatively small in scale, estimates vary widely, and no study appears to have tracked risks from commencement of firearm ownership.

READ MORE
4 Jun

How Can We Stay Safe As Coronovirus Restrictions Are Lifted?

It can feel like people are responding with an all-or-nothing approach: Either you stay locked in your house alone, or you’re at a party with a hundred maskless strangers. But those aren’t the only choices, says Neil Maniar, a professor of the practice and director of Northeastern’s Master of Public Health program.

READ MORE
4 Jun

Measuring Speech Intelligibility in Children With Motor Speech Disorders

Reduced speech intelligibility limits functional communication for many children with motor speech disorders, and improving intelligibility is often a primary goal of intervention. Objective measurement of intelligibility is important for quantifying severity of speech impairment and tracking progress in therapy; however, there is little standardization of methods for measuring speech intelligibility in clinical settings.

READ MORE
4 Jun

‘We Have To Treat Everybody As Though They Have It’

During her shifts at two hospital emergency departments in Boston, Victoria Diaz braces for COVID-19 cases, whether they’re obvious or not. Some patients arrive in need of immediate intubation. “Sometimes other people who are completely asymptomatic come back positive,” says Diaz, a rising fifth-year nursing student at Northeastern. “We have to treat everybody as though they have it.”

READ MORE
4 Jun

‘This Was a Unique Time To Use My Passion’

Last year, Maura Eaton and her classmates stocked an orphanage in Latacunga, a plateau town in Ecuador, with ankle and foot braces, balls, mats, and wheelchairs. While they were in Ecuador, the nearly 20-member group of physical therapy students from Northeastern, their professor, and a pediatric physical therapist, also provided physical therapy to children at another orphanage in the country’s capital, Quito. The weeklong trip, said Eaton, a doctoral student of physical therapy at Northeastern, was easily one of the most rewarding experiences of her life

READ MORE
4 Jun

Providing Personal Protective Equipment To People In Need ‘Is Not a Sprint–It’s a Marathon’

“I feel that getting everyone access to personal protective equipment, and recovering from COVID-19 as a whole, is not a sprint, it’s more of a marathon,” says Hall. “I believed all along if every person just donated one mask, we would really be able to overcome the shortage of protective equipment.”

READ MORE
26 May

The person walking past you isn’t wearing a mask. What should you say?

So, when you spot a person going maskless in public, should you call them out? If you don’t, are you not doing enough to help protect people who are at higher risk of developing serious complications if they contract COVID-19? You know the feeling. You can’t possibly know why people aren’t wearing masks. They might have a health condition that makes it hard to breathe. Maybe they’re afraid of being racially profiled. Still, there’s tension when you see an uncovered face in public.

READ MORE
26 May

They chose to stay and help fight COVID-19

Before Susan Dawson enters Massachusetts General Hospital, she checks off a form affirming that she has no known symptoms of COVID-19. “I’m glad I had hospital experience before this all broke out,” says Dawson, a third-year nursing student at Northeastern who is serving her second co-op at Mass General. “I think I would have been a lot more scared and tentative if I had not.”

READ MORE
26 May

Models can predict how COVID-19 will spread. What goes into them, and how can we use what they tell us?

Countries around the world are grappling with how to handle the COVID-19 pandemic. Some of the best tools global leaders have at their disposal are epidemiological models, which predict how the disease will spread. But what goes into these models, and how do leaders and public health authorities use this information? On Thursday, Joseph E. Aoun, president of Northeastern, will sit down for a conversation with Alessandro Vespignani, the director of Northeastern’s Network Science Institute, who is leading one of the major efforts to model this disease.

READ MORE
26 May

A guilty pleasure to get you through quarantine–that’s actually good for you

Along with sourdough starter and Zoom calls, video games are enjoying a resurgence in popularity among people of all ages who are craving entertainment and social connection while stuck at home in quarantine. As far as guilty pleasures go, says Amy Lu, an associate professor of communication studies and health sciences at Northeastern, video games are worth indulging in for the benefits they provide to a player’s physical and mental health. One small caveat: She’s not talking about just any video game.

READ MORE
26 May

Homeless populations have been hit hard by COVID-19. She’s stepping in to help

Sanitize your hands. Put a pair of gloves on. Put on your gown. Put a second pair of gloves on. Put your mask on. Slide your face shield over your head. Finally, step into the patient area. Sarah Calnan recites the steps in rapid-fire succession; they’re as familiar to her now as the back of her gloved hand.

READ MORE