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11 Aug

How Word Detectives solved the mystery of teaching reading from afar

“Normally, kids will come in and tell stories about home, but now we were seeing and living with them,” Young-Hong says. “In the past, parents haven’t come in during instructional times but some of the parents were there with their kids and seeing what was happening, and sending messages like ‘Wow I’m impressed with how my daughter is engaging, I didn’t think this would work but it did.’”

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11 Aug

Trying to separate life from work while stuck at home during COVID-19? Develop a ‘shutdown ritual’

“People are engaging in these behaviors and rituals to transition themselves from work to home,” said Laura Dudley, an associate clinical professor in applied psychology at Northeastern University. “These routines can be really beneficial, especially during uncertain or uncomfortable times, like we’re in right now.”

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11 Aug

Grad Spotlight | Shashank Madhu

I started Northeastern wanting to be a doctor, plain and simple. I joined the Health Science major because I thought that it would be a good stepping stone to the healthcare field. To be quite honest, I actually didn’t even know what Health Science entailed. I just thought it would be more up my alley than going a traditional biology or biochem route to med school. It was only when I went on a Dialogue to London at the end of my freshman year that I learnt the importance of the Health Science major. Public health has shaped our entire lives in many unseen and unspoken ways, and now we are seeing the consequences of its failing.

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11 Aug

Machine learning predicts adverse drug reactions based on drugs’ in vitro pharmacology

Through machine learning, they were able to systematically predict the drug effects on human patient populations from their target-based preclinical profiles

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11 Aug

How Has COVID-19 Affected Mental Health And Well-Being?

"Thinking about those things as students come back and as people ease out of COVID-19—whenever that will be—will be super important, whether it’s social connection or thinking about the larger things on a societal level: Employment supports, supports for food insecurity, [which] not only affects eating behaviors but has a huge upstream or downstream—depending on which version you use—on all aspects of mental health and well-being,” said Lincoln, who serves as associate dean of research at the College of Social Sciences and Humanities, and director of the Institute for Health Equity and Social Justice Research.

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27 Jul

Is Contact Tracing Enough To Slow The Spread Of COVID-19?

The panelists, all three of whom are students in or graduates of the Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern, offered insights working as contract tracers in Massachusetts since April during a July 23 webinar hosted by Bouvé on the importance of contact tracing.

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23 Jul

The research is clear: White people are not more likely than Black people to be killed by police.

Northeastern professor Matt Miller says that Trump’s response was a “grotesque” misdirection that fails to account for the fact that Black people are killed by police at a higher rate than white people. A recent study by Miller found that Black people are shot and killed by police at twice the rate that white people are.

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23 Jul

Are these uncertain times keeping you up? The solution might be personal.

You might want a story on quick tips for a good night’s sleep. On how to stop dwelling about this uneasy 2020 and make up for the nights ruined by those damned fireworks. This is not that story.

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23 Jul

Here’s Why Guns Increase The Risk Of Suicide–Especially In Stressful Times

“It reinforces what we in some ways already knew,” Miller says of the handguns study. “Which is that if someone is going through a hard time, the single most effective thing you can do to reduce the likelihood that that person is going to die is to get that gun out of the home, or otherwise make it inaccessible to the person who’s at risk.”

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23 Jul

How one communication tool may fail some autistic people

Many parents spend 30 minutes or more a day practicing the method, and some attend regular sessions with providers in the hope that it will enable their child to one day type independently on a keyboard, as appeared to happen with Tito. His story was recounted by the BBC and 60 Minutes, and in the 2010 documentary “A Mother’s Courage: Talking Back to Autism,” narrated by actress Kate Winslet.

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23 Jul

A Pandemic Problem for Older Workers: Will They Have to Retire Sooner?

I’m going to keep working virtually — the idea of going into an office building, and not knowing who’s going in and out — I’m really not sure about that,” she said. “And sitting in a room with clients with both of us wearing masks — I wouldn’t be able to see their facial expressions. So I am now for the first time feeling at a crossroads

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23 Jul

How to talk to kids about systemic racism and anti-Black violence

Explaining racism to children is an essential conversation in families, irrespective of race or skin color, says Tracy Robinson-Wood, a professor of applied psychology who studies the intersectionality of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class, as well as racial socialization in interracial families

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23 Jul

Sleep Solutions

Do you spend more time counting sheep than you do getting sleep? Lichuan Ye, associate professor of nursing, shares ways to calm your thoughts and secure some shut-eye

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17 Jun

How to stay safe from a pandemic while protesting racial injustice

“We have the public health crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic and we have the public health crisis of systemic racism,” says Neil Maniar, a professor of the practice and director of Northeastern’s Master of Public Health program. “I think the central question is, how do you protect yourself against one public health crisis, while advocating to address another?”

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17 Jun

First-time gun owners at risk for suicide, major study confirms

The decision to buy a handgun for the first time is typically motivated by self-protection. But it also raises the purchasers’ risk of deliberately shooting themselves by ninefold on average, with the danger most acute in the weeks after purchase, scientists reported last week. The risk remains elevated for years, they said.

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17 Jun

Women who own handguns at 35X risk of suicide

There were 24,432 gun suicides in the United States in 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Three-quarters of them involved handguns.

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