Video: Meet PharmD student Melissa Gallo who applied through the early assurance pathway. Check out our other PharmD entry pathways on the program page.

School of
Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

YOU ARE BOUVÉ

Programs

In the field or in the classroom, experience forms the foundation of everything we do.

Research

Research lies at the heart of the Bouvé educational experience.

Real-world experience along side faculty experts and innovators

Dedicated to excellence in pharmacy-related education, research, and service including the provision of patient care, we prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and values for careers in pharmacy practice and the pharmaceutical sciences.

Our programs promote intellectual growth, professionalism, and lifelong learning. The school contributes to improved individual and population health through the generation and dissemination of new knowledge and through scholarship and community service.

at a glance

#1

in U.S. among private schools of pharmacy for research funding
— NIH

120+

affiliated hospitals, clinics, community pharmacies, private companies, and government agencies

94%

first time NAPLEX licensure exam Pass Rate — consistently above the national average

100%

of students complete at least two six-month co-ops

Departments

  • Northeastern male student with blue hair using a pipette under a fume hood to do pharmaceutical research

    Pharmaceutical Sciences

    With programs in Biomedical Science, Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Discovery, Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, Pharmacology.

  • Pharmacy student of color giving flu shots at Northeastern University's student health fair

    Pharmacy and Health Systems Sciences

    With programs in Health Science (aligns with pre-med/pre-health aspirations), Public Health, Exercise Science, Health Informatics, Real World Evidence, and various interdisciplinary programs and dual degrees.

Video: Student Eva Houser (PharmD’24) shares about her co-op experience at MGH | Northeastern

Research Labs and Centers

  • Tali Konry Lab

    Tali Konry

    The Konry lab researches cell to cell interactions, tissue engineering, vaccine delivery methods, diagnostic tools, and assay development, amongst other research.

  • Genetics of addiction, picture of cells

    Laboratory of Addiction Genetics

    This lab integrates classical forward genetics in mice with contemporary genome editing and -omics approaches to understanding the mechanisms that confer susceptibility versus resistance toward substance use disorders. 

Video:

School News

Programs

Strategic plan and more

Mission and Core Values

The School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences embraces and upholds the university’s core values of:

Contribution – Northeastern seeks to contribute to the individual fulfillment of each member of the campus, to the welfare of the surrounding communities, and to solutions that will address global and societal needs.

Diversity – Northeastern celebrates diversity in all its forms and fosters a culture of respect that affirms inter-group relations and builds community.

Engagement – Northeastern promotes active engagement in teaching and learning, in scholarship and research, in the life of urban communities and with our alumni and friends.

Integrity – Northeastern pursues each of its activities and interactions with integrity, maintaining the highest ethical standards.

Opportunity – Northeastern provides opportunities to those who strive to overcome disadvantages and show great promise for future success.

Strategic Plan Initiatives

1. Advance the curricula of all programs to meet and exceed institutional, professional and accreditation standards.

2. Recruit and develop students to reflect institutional values

3. Attract, retain and develop faculty and staff to support the mission and goals of the school

4. Strengthen and expand research and other scholarly activity in the school’s disciplinary areas.

5. Strategically engage external stakeholders in activities of the school and support faculty visibility locally, regionally, nationally, internationally.


Strategic Plan and Comments

Comments on strategic plan welcomed.
Please email: [email protected]

The Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program at Northeastern University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences is fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) through June 30, 2026. The school’s Continuing Professional Education Program is fully accredited by ACPE through June 30, 2022.

The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) is the national agency for the accreditation of professional degree programs in pharmacy and providers of continuing pharmacy education.

ACPE (until 2003 known as the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education) was established in 1932 for the accreditation of professional degree programs in pharmacy, and in 1975 its scope was broadened to include accreditation of providers of continuing pharmacy education.

The mission of ACPE is to assure and advance quality in pharmacy education. ACPE is an autonomous and independent agency whose Board of Directors is appointed by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP), the American Pharmacists Association (APhA), the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) (three appointments each), and the American Council on Education (one appointment).

Since the inception of its accreditation agency recognition program in 1952, ACPE has been recognized continuously by the U.S. Department of Education, and it gained recognition by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation in April 2004.

State boards of pharmacy require that licensure applicants from the United States have graduated from an accredited pharmacy degree program to be eligible to sit for the North American Pharmacist Licensure ExaminationTM (NAPLEX®).


ACPE Accreditation Standards and Guidelines

First time NAPLEX attempts

Consistently above national averages for first time pass rate

First time NEPLEX attempts202120222023
Northeastern95%82%94%
National82%78%79%
* Source NABP

Source: NAPLEX Pass Rates 2022

Comparison On-Time Graduation Rates

On-Time Graduation Rates202120222023
Northeastern81.9%87.7%78.6%
National86.9%86.7%Pending
*Source AAMS

Comparison of Attrition Rates

Attrition Rates202120222023
Northeastern18.1%12.3%21.4%
National13.1%13.3%Pending
*Source AAMS

Employment

Class of:
2023*75% of graduates employed within 1 month of graduation
2022*98% of graduates employed within 1 month of graduation
* Graduates that responded to our survey

Residency, Fellowship, and Post

Percent achieving postgraduate education and training.

Graduating ClassNumber of PostsPercentage
202258 Residencies, fellowships and postgraduate degree programs46%
202152 Residencies, fellowships and postgraduate degree programs56%
202058 Residencies, fellowships and postgraduate degree programs45%

School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Core Learning Outcomes for all Programs

  1. Develop, integrate, and apply knowledge from the foundational sciences (e.g., biomedical, pharmaceutical, social/behavioral/administrative, or clinical sciences) to evaluate the scientific literature, explain drug action, solve therapeutic problems, and advance population health, patient-centered care and/or drug discovery and development.
  2. Apply scientific principles to design research and/or educational strategies with the aim of improving health and wellness.
  3. Identify problems; explore and prioritize potential strategies; and design, implement, and evaluate viable solutions with a goal of generating new knowledge.
  4. Educate all audiences by determining the most effective and enduring ways to impart information and assess learning.
  5. Actively participate and engage as a healthcare and/or drug discovery and development team member by demonstrating mutual respect, understanding, and values.
  6. Effectively communicate verbally and nonverbally when interacting with individuals, groups, organizations, and other team members.
  7. Examine and reflect on personal knowledge, skills, abilities, beliefs, biases, motivation, and emotions that could enhance or limit personal and professional growth.
  8. Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of position.
  9. Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways of accomplishing professional goals.
  10. Exhibit behaviors and values consistent with the trust given to their profession.

Pharmaceutical Sciences (BS)

Upon completion of the program, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate evidence-based knowledge of the scientific foundations of medication research, approval and development.
  2. Apply scientific knowledge and principles of biological sciences, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacogenomics to generate hypotheses, to design scientific experiments, to reliably execute experimental protocols, to statistically analyze and interpret scientific data, and to generate scientific
  3. Apply quantitative principles in the calculations of doses, concentrations, molarities, standard curves and of pharmacokinetics.
  4. Use communication and information technology effectively and
  5. Retrieve, analyze, interpret, synthesize, and manage professional, lay, and scientific information and literature.
  6. Collaborate and communicate with other members of an interdisciplinary laboratory research
  7. Demonstrate effective written and verbal communication skills in order to present scientific
  8. Accurately and safely prepare, store and use drugs and chemicals in accordance to applicable environmental health and safety
  9. Demonstrate project management skills including project design, implementation, and
  10. Demonstrate critical thinking and problem-solving
  11. Exhibit ethical behavior and resolve dilemmas that arise in the research laboratory setting based on ethical principles of

Biomedical Science (MS)

The MS program learning outcomes are the following:

  1. Students will have met the objectives for learning outcomes in an undergraduate discipline relevant to their graduate field of study.
  2. Graduates will be able to summarize major themes and current research problems in their area of specialization.
  3. Graduates will be able to communicate the major tenets of their field and their work orally and in writing for students, peers and the lay public.
  4. Graduates will be able to identify areas where ethical issues may arise in their work or discipline, and articulate strategies for dealing with ethical issues in the profession.
  5. Graduates will be able to explain and identify open problems and areas needing development in their fields.
  6. Graduates will have carried out and presented an original work of research in their discipline, as applicable in Thesis bearing Master’s Program.

Medicinal Chemistry (MS)

The MS program learning outcomes are the following:

  1. Students will have met the objectives for learning outcomes in an undergraduate discipline relevant to their graduate field of study.
  2. Graduates will be able to summarize major themes and current research problems in their area of specialization.
  3. Graduates will be able to communicate the major tenets of their field and their work orally and in writing for students, peers and the lay public.
  4. Graduates will be able to identify areas where ethical issues may arise in their work or discipline, and articulate strategies for dealing with ethical issues in the profession.
  5. Graduates will be able to explain and identify open problems and areas needing development in their fields.
  6. Graduates will have carried out and presented an original work of research in their discipline, as applicable in Thesis bearing Master’s Program.

Pharmaceutical Science (MS)

The MS program learning outcomes are the following:

  1. Students will have met the objectives for learning outcomes in an undergraduate discipline relevant to their graduate field of study.
  2. Graduates will be able to summarize major themes and current research problems in their area of specialization.
  3. Graduates will be able to communicate the major tenets of their field and their work orally and in writing for students, peers and the lay public.
  4. Graduates will be able to identify areas where ethical issues may arise in their work or discipline, and articulate strategies for dealing with ethical issues in the profession.
  5. Graduates will be able to explain and identify open problems and areas needing development in their fields.
  6. Graduates will have carried out and presented an original work of research in their discipline, as applicable in Thesis bearing Master’s Program.

Pharmacology (MS)

The MS program learning outcomes are the following:

  1. Students will have met the objectives for learning outcomes in an undergraduate discipline relevant to their graduate field of study.
  2. Graduates will be able to summarize major themes and current research problems in their area of specialization.
  3. Graduates will be able to communicate the major tenets of their field and their work orally and in writing for students, peers and the lay public.
  4. Graduates will be able to identify areas where ethical issues may arise in their work or discipline, and articulate strategies for dealing with ethical issues in the profession.
  5. Graduates will be able to explain and identify open problems and areas needing development in their fields.
  6. Graduates will have carried out and presented an original work of research in their discipline, as applicable in Thesis bearing Master’s Program.

Biomedical Science (PhD)

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program learning outcomes are the following:

  1. Students will have met the objectives for learning outcomes in an undergraduate discipline relevant to their graduate field of study.
  2. Graduates will be able to summarize major themes and current research problems in their area of specialization.
  3. Graduates will be able to communicate the major tenets of their field and their work orally and in writing for students, peers and the lay public.
  4. Graduates will be able to identify areas where ethical issues may arise in their work or discipline, and articulate strategies for dealing with ethical issues in the profession.
  5. Graduates will be able to explain and identify open problems and areas needing development in their fields.
  6. Graduates will have carried out and presented an original work of research in their discipline.

Medicinal Chemistry (PhD)

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program learning outcomes are the following:

  1. Students will have met the objectives for learning outcomes in an undergraduate discipline relevant to their graduate field of study.
  2. Graduates will be able to summarize major themes and current research problems in their area of specialization.
  3. Graduates will be able to communicate the major tenets of their field and their work orally and in writing for students, peers and the lay public.
  4. Graduates will be able to identify areas where ethical issues may arise in their work or discipline, and articulate strategies for dealing with ethical issues in the profession.
  5. Graduates will be able to explain and identify open problems and areas needing development in their fields.
  6. Graduates will have carried out and presented an original work of research in their discipline.

Pharmaceutical Science (PhD)

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program learning outcomes are the following:

  1. Students will have met the objectives for learning outcomes in an undergraduate discipline relevant to their graduate field of study.
  2. Graduates will be able to summarize major themes and current research problems in their area of specialization.
  3. Graduates will be able to communicate the major tenets of their field and their work orally and in writing for students, peers and the lay public.
  4. Graduates will be able to identify areas where ethical issues may arise in their work or discipline, and articulate strategies for dealing with ethical issues in the profession.
  5. Graduates will be able to explain and identify open problems and areas needing development in their fields.
  6. Graduates will have carried out and presented an original work of research in their discipline.

Pharmacology (PhD)

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program learning outcomes are the following:

  1. Students will have met the objectives for learning outcomes in an undergraduate discipline relevant to their graduate field of study.
  2. Graduates will be able to summarize major themes and current research problems in their area of specialization.
  3. Graduates will be able to communicate the major tenets of their field and their work orally and in writing for students, peers and the lay public.
  4. Graduates will be able to identify areas where ethical issues may arise in their work or discipline, and articulate strategies for dealing with ethical issues in the profession.
  5. Graduates will be able to explain and identify open problems and areas needing development in their fields.
  6. Graduates will have carried out and presented an original work of research in their discipline.

Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD)

Outcomes — Sept ’23 onwards

Upon completion of the program, students will be able to:

  1. Collect information necessary to identify a patient’s medication-related problems and health-related needs.
  2. Assess collected information to determine a patient’s medication-related problems and health-related needs.
  3. Create a care plan in collaboration with the patient, others trusted by the patient, and other health professionals to optimize pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment.
  4. Contribute patient specific medication-related expertise as part of an interprofessional care team.
  5. Answer medication related questions using scientific literature.
  6. Implement a care plan in collaboration with the patient, others trusted by the patient, and other health professionals.
  7. Fulfill a medication order.
  8. Educate the patient and others trusted by the patient regarding the appropriate use of a medication, device to administer a medication, or self-monitoring test.
  9. Monitor and evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a care plan.
  10. Report adverse drug events and/or medication errors in accordance with site specific procedures.
  11. Deliver medication or health-related education to health professionals or the public.
  12. Identify populations at risk for prevalent diseases and preventable adverse medication outcomes.
  13. Perform the technical, administrative, and supporting operations of a pharmacy practice site.
  14. Create a written plan for continuous professional development.

Outcomes — Through Spring ’26 (Legacy)

Ability based outcomes for the Doctor of Pharmacy Degree†
Domain 1 – Foundational Knowledge

1.1. Learner (Learner)

Develop, integrate, and apply knowledge from the foundational sciences (i.e., pharmaceutical, social/behavioral/administrative, and clinical sciences) to evaluate the scientific literature, explain drug action, solve therapeutic problems, and advance population health and patient— centered care.

Domain 2 – Essentials for Practice and Care

2.1. Patient—centered care (Caregiver)

Provide patient—centered care as the medication expert (collect and interpret evidence, prioritize, formulate assessments and recommendations, implement, monitor and adjust plans, and document activities).

2.2. Medication use systems management (Manager)

Manage patient healthcare needs using human, financial, technological, and physical resources to optimize the safety and efficacy of medication use systems.

2.3. Health andwellness (Promoter)

Design prevention, intervention, and educational strategies for individuals and communities to manage chronic disease and improve health and wellness.

2.4. Population—based care (Provider)

Describe how population—based care influences patient— centered care and influences the development of practice guidelines and evidence—based best practices.

Domain 3 — Approach to Practice and Care

3.1. Problem Solving (Problem Solver)

Identify problems; explore and prioritize potential strategies; and design, implement, and evaluate a viable solution.

3.2. Educator (Educator)

Educate all audiences by determining the most effective and enduring ways to impart information and assess understanding.

3.3. Patient Advocacy (Advocate)

Assure that patients’ best interests are represented.

3.4. Interprofessional collaboration (Collaborator)

Actively participate and engage as a healthcare team member by demonstrating mutual respect, understanding, and values to meet patient care needs.

3.5. Culturalsensitivity (Includer)

Recognize social determinants of health to diminish disparities and inequities in access to quality care.

3.6. Communication (Communicator)

Effectively communicate verbally and nonverbally when interacting with an individual, group, or organization.

Domain 4 – Personal and Professional Development

4.1. Self—awareness (Self—aware)

Examine and reflect on personal knowledge, skills, abilities, beliefs, biases, motivation, and emotions that could enhance or limit personal and professional growth.

4.2. Leadership (Leader)

Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of position.

4.3. Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Innovator)

Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways ofaccomplishing professional goals.

4.4. Professionalism (Professional)

Exhibit behaviors and values that are consistent with the trust given to the profession bypatients, other healthcare providers, and society.

† Adopted from Medina M, Plaza CM, Stowe CD, et al. Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education 2013 Educational Outcomes. Am J Pharm Ed. 2013;77(8):162.
Approved, 2013

Code of Professional Conduct

Diversity Statement

The School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences values the diversity espoused by Northeastern University and the Bouvé College of Health Sciences community.

This includes respect for the multiple and diverse identities of our shared humanity such as race, ethnicity, class, ability, language, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, age, nationality, and military service.

We enliven the climate of diversity in Bouvé through culturally informed teaching, learning, scientific discovery and scholarship, patient care, service, dialogue, and relationship building. Our academic community is committed to advocacy, equity and inclusion for all.

Policy

The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), the pharmacy school accreditation agency, is required by the U.S. Department of Education to assure that pharmacy programs have a policy to record and address student complaints regarding a school’s adherence to the ACPE Accreditation Standards and Guidelines for the Professional Program in Pharmacy Leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy Degree hereinafter referred to as the “ACPE Standards”.

The purpose of this policy is to provide the opportunity for pharmacy students to document complaints about the School’s adherence to any of the ACPE Standards. Complaints may relate to matters involving the curriculum, faculty, student affairs or other areas relating to specific ACPE standards. In the case of common academic matters within the School (e.g., grade challenges, academic standing reviews and appeals, etc.), students should refer to policies of procedures of the school and college, as outlined in the Undergraduate Student Information Manual, and the Graduate Student Information Manual.

Procedure

  • Student complaints are filed with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs in the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (SOPPS).Complaints must be submitted in writing using the complaint form. The student must specify which ACPE standard, policy or procedure is in question, provide a summary of the claim and include supporting evidence, as applicable. Receipt of the Complaint Form will be acknowledged via e-mail by the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs.
  • The student will be invited to meet with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs to discuss the complaint. If the Assistant Dean cannot resolve the issue to the student’s satisfaction, he/she will form an ad hoc committee consisting of three faculty who are not involved with the issue, a pharmacy student, and a staff member from the Bouvé College Office of Student Services. The committee will review the complaint and make a recommendation to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs within 10 business days of the committee’s formation. The complainant may be invited to meet with the committee to answer questions. Minutes must be taken at all committee meetings.
  • The student will receive a written response from the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs within five business days of the conclusion of committee’s deliberations. The response will include an evaluation of the complaint and the decision of the committee. Should the committee find that a violation of an accreditation standard has occurred, a proposal for corrective action and a corresponding timeline will be outlined.
  • If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the committee, he/she may appeal to the Dean of the SOPPS. Appeals must be received by the Dean’s office within five business days of the issuance of the committee’s report to the student. The Dean will review the case and render their decision within 10 business days of receipt of the appeal. The decision of the School Dean is final.
  • This process is the sole mechanism within the SOPPS for submission of student complaints regarding ACPE Standards.
  • Any student who wishes to file a complaint with ACPE for unresolved issues related to ACPE Standards may visit the ACPE website and follow the student link to access the procedures for filing a complaint.
  • All written complaints, investigations, committee meeting minutes, reports, and correspondence relating to the complaints will be retained in a confidential file and made available to an ACPE site-visit team in accordance with ACPE Accreditation Standards.

School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Administrative Offices Located at 140 Fenway

Mailing Address
Northeastern University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
360 Huntington Avenue, R218 TF
Boston, MA 02115

Office of the Dean
Tel: 617-373-5209
[email protected]


PharmD Admission Inquiries:
[email protected]

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Program Inquiries
[email protected]
617-373-3224

Department of Pharmacy and Health Systems Sciences
617-373-5226
[email protected]

Continuing Pharmacy Education
617-373-5418
[email protected]

Office of Experiential Education
617-373-4176
[email protected]

Meet the Dean of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Tatiana Bronich, PhD

Dr. Bronich is a PhD-trained polymer chemist, whose research interests are in the area of self-assembling polymer materials and applications of these materials in medicine. She is passionate about developing novel classes of environmentally and chemical-stimuli responsive nanoparticles and gels and conducts fundamental studies on structure and transitions in these materials.

School Leadership

Tatiana Bronich

PhD

Associate Dean, Bouvé College of Health Sciences; Dean, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Science Pharmaceutical Sciences

Debra Copeland

PharmD, RPh, FNAP

Associate Clinical Professor; Asst. Dean, Office of Experiential and Continuing Professional Education Pharmacy and Health Systems Science

Michael Gonyeau

PharmD, MEd, FNAP, FCCP, BCPS, RPh

Clinical Professor and Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs and Assessment, School Leadership Team, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Pharmacy and Health Systems Science

J. Andrew Orr-Skirvin

PharmD, RPh, BCOP

Chair, Department of Pharmacy and Health Systems Sciences; Director of Pharmaceutical Industry Fellowship Program; Clinical Professor Pharmacy and Health Systems Science

Karen Stanley

MBA

Director of Operations, Finance and Administration School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Jenny Van Amburgh

PharmD, RPh, FAPhA, FNAP, BCACP, CDCES

Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs, Director of Post-Graduate Education, Clinical Professor Pharmacy and Health Systems Science